Ep. 138: Pointed Photography Predictions For 2017 – and more

by Staff January 1, 2017 at 12:19 pm

Fine Art photographer Lucas Zimmermann’s long exposure photographs of traffic lights in the fog are oddly satisfying. At once creepy and serene, his 2013 series Traffic Lights and this month’s follow-up Traffic Lights 2.0 are both worth checking out.

If you’re in the market for a high-end full-frame camera, chances are good the Canon 5D Mark IV, Sony A7R II, and Nikon D810 are all contenders. Check out this side-by-side comparison if you’re having a hard time deciding which of the three is best for you.

Photographer Andy Seliverstoff over St. Petersburg, Russia, has been working on a heartwarming photo project that will put a smile on your face, particularly if you’re a dog lover. It’s titled, “Little Kids and Their Big Dogs.”

When photographer Tamás Szarka of Budapest, Hungary, takes his down Strawberry for walks, he often brings a camera to capture the 6-year-old boxer’s crazy facial expressions as she sprints around.

If there is one genre of street photography I specialize in, it is street portraiture. I love talking with my subjects, engaging with them, and focusing on their faces. If I started shooting street portraits all over again, this is the advice I would give myself.

Another year has come to a close. As we wrap up 2016, here’s a look back at the 10 most popular posts published on PetaPixel over the past 365 days.

Magic Lantern may soon release their most popular feature since RAW video. A few of the folks who constantly improve the Canon software add-on have just found a way to generate 14-bit lossless DNG RAW files in-camera!

Sigma’s new 500mm f/4 Sport is getting a lot of attention. It might be because it’s the first telephoto prime in its new ART/SPORT series of lenses, or it might be because of the price tag of $5,999. That’s $3,000 less than the Canon and almost $4,300 less than the Nikon, while only being $1,000 more than the older Sigma 500mm f/4.5.

My original 52 Week Challenge in 2016 was a huge success, with tens of thousands of photographers participating from around the world. In celebration of those who have completed the first challenge, a new challenge is now here!

Ever wonder what the difference between an F-Stop and a T-Stop is? If you’ve never bothered to look up and understand this bit of light transmission trivia, listen up: this simple video does the work for you.

Artists have long used the golden ratio as a guide for creating aesthetically pleasing art, as it’s believed that the human brain is hardwired to find the proportions inherently beautiful. Take a look at the work of legendary photographer Ansel Adams, and you may find the golden ratio tracing out many of their notable features.

Have you ever asked yourself what the best focal length for your first (or your next) prime lens should be? If you use mostly zoom lenses, Adobe Lightroom may be able to help.

British photojournalist and war photographer Don McCullin was knighted this week for his “services to photography.”

One hundred and nineteen dollars. That’s it. That’s all you need to open a door to a world of photography previously known only to the most extreme DIYers and commercial photographers for whom purchasing decisions are usually made for them by client requests.

Famous photographers throughout history have produced some incredible images that have stood the test of time, but it’s not only their photographs that are inspirational.
Their acute insights into the creative process have guided generations of photographers and shaped the way even today’s best photographers think about their subjects and scenes.
If you’re stuck for inspiration, or even motivation, we’ve put together 50 quotes from the most inspirational and talented photographers the world has seen to help you get your mojo back.

They say a picture is worth a thousand words. But I wonder, what else do “they” say? In order to find out I’ve culled together the best quotes on the subject of photography. I hope they inspire you.

One woman just received a big lesson on how NOT to treat photographers, and one photographer is being praised for how she handled an extremely difficult client.

If you’re looking to get better at photography in 2016, one great option is to do a 52-week photography challenge that forces you to complete regular assignments throughout the whole year. And we’ve found a great one you can take on as your new year’s resolution.

Many years ago when I was a starry-eyed undergrad I would ask every photographer I came across the same question:
“How do I take better photos?” 

I was extremely lucky to have many talented and generous photographers take me under their wing to show me the ropes. Without their valuable advice there is no way I would have become the photographer I am today. 


Ironically, the number one question I now get asked as an Open producer is “How do I take better photos?” 


So along with some tips that I’ve picked up over the years, I’ve recruited some outstanding snappers across Australia to share their own secret techniques about how they take their photos to the next level. 



Peter Thoshinsky joined the San Francisco Police Department back in 1982. After serving as a cop for 31 years, his career in the department took a major turn: he became the official “historical photographer” for the SFPD.

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