This is First Lady Melania Trump’s Official White House Portrait

by Staff April 3, 2017 at 3:20 pm

We hear everyone in the photography industry talking about image quality, image quality, image quality. We especially hear about this in any circle of people chatting (or writing) about night photography. Conversations (and books, articles and blog posts) are rife with opinions and advice about how to push the limits of our cameras and lenses in order to get the best image quality in low-light situations.

The World Press Photo Awards isn’t the only prestigious photo competition that experienced controversy this year: the 2017 Sony World Photography Awards received at least one complaint of plagiarism by a photo selected for the Open competition shortlist.

Commercial photographer Vatsal Kataria of New Delhi, India, shoots big photos with small budgets. Instead of taking expensive cars and motorcycles into grand outdoor locations, Kataria builds detailed miniature sets in his studio.

It is yet again the day of the year on which you can’t trust anything you see online. Here’s a roundup of some of the April Fools’ Day jokes that have emerged in the world of photography in 2017.

From the beginning of my photography career—which is … almost 30 years ago (that can’t be true!)—I’ve been shooting with zoom lenses. Due to the flexibility they offer, I was convinced they make the best choice; as far as I know, thousands of other travel photographers who would say the same.

Here’s a juicy research & development tidbit straight from the executives at Canon. In an interview with Focus Numerique at the Utsunomiya L lens factory in Japan, Canon said they’re working on a “new lens technology.”

Five years after beginning its very long journey, NASA’s Juno spacecraft has beamed back photos of Jupiter’s poles for the first time… and they’re stunning.

I was scrolling through my Instagram feed one Friday night when a promoted post popped up and caught my eye (and there wasn’t even a bikini, donut or motivational quote involved).

About a week ago, the FBI quietly re-released a collection of photos from the 9/11 aftermath into their online records vault. The photos, which focus on the wreckage at the Pentagon, were originally published in 2011, but disappeared for some time due to a technical glitch.

Over the past few weeks, the PetaPixel tip line has been flooded by reports of Instagram ‘shadow banning’ accounts. This practice, ostensibly limited to business accounts, is destroying engagement on these photographer’s profiles.

Along with normal how-to articles and essays, I’ve always liked reading and writing very technical, nitty-gritty articles about photography—sometimes, articles on topics that rarely come up while actually taking pictures.

They say a picture is worth a thousand words. But I wonder, what else do “they” say? In order to find out I’ve culled together the best quotes on the subject of photography. I hope they inspire you.

Given that most photos are captured digitally and shared online, it’s easy to forget the beauty of a print.

Bentley has captured what they’re calling “the world’s most detailed landscape photo”: a 57.7 gigapixel interactive ad stitched together from 1,825 individual frames captured from atop one of the tallest towers in Dubai.

If you’ve ever loaded up a large camera backpack (like something from Think Tank Photo or LowePro) and hiked a mountain, you’ll be able to fully appreciate how terrible the experience is… well, except for the views.

Two pairs of researchers from Cornell University and Adobe have teamed up and developed a “Deep Photo Style Transfer” algorithm that can automatically apply the style (read: color and lighting) of one photo to another. The early results are incredibly impressive and promising.

So much of the world today is invisible to cameras. Technology operates in a light-less world of zeroes and ones, electromagnetic waves that fly over our heads in ever-increasing abundance.
For his fascinating project Digital Ethereal, designer Luis Hernan set out to capture one of these invisible signals, WiFi, using a creative combination of long exposure photography and an Android app.

The biggest photography announcement of the week came from Hasselblad. In a move that is being praised by most of the photo community, the storied camera company appointed photographer Ming Thein as its new Chief of Strategy, leaving us all to wonder “what happens now?” PetaPixel sat down with Ming to find out.

The folks at National Geographic just did a solid favor for all the adventurous outdoor photographers out there. They put every US Geological Survey (USGS) topographical map from across the United States on one easy-to-navigate site and made them easy to print out at home.

From time to time when I read about Street Photography, I hear the opinion that street photographers exploit people on the street by taking their picture without asking. This opinion raises some valid questions about the ethics of Street Photography, but also shows the double standards we follow in the media.

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