When a Camera’s Frame Rate is Synced to a Helicopter’s Rotor…

by Staff March 4, 2017 at 1:44 pm

40 years ago, Bob Khoury and Warren Steinberg started selling used photo equipment out of a showcase in an Atlanta, Georgia, flea market. Soon they moved to a brick and mortar store which, to incorporate their earlier experience, they called Showcase. The store grew to be the largest in Atlanta and sold photo and video equipment to amateurs and professionals alike and last year they celebrated their 40th anniversary.

I recently rediscovered an old photography technique that allows you to add surreal color to photos that show movement in the frame. The technique seems to be new in the digital domain, but the technique itself has been known since the early era of digital photography.

I initially refused to believe it when this photo came across my feed. My eyes aren’t broken! I can see they’re strawberries, and they’re definitely red. They have to be trolling us with this image, right?

Things aren’t looking good for the standalone point-and-shoot camera. As smartphone cameras continue to improve, compact camera sales continue to nosedive. A new historical sales chart with 2016 figures shows just how quickly point-and-shoots are dying off.

The photographer brand COOPH made this 3-minute video in which photographer Lorenz Holder shares the interesting story behind how he shot a photo that won the prestigious photo contest Red Bull Illume 2016.

I’m a firm believer that photography is a game of inches. So today I’ll share with you what I’ve learned about mastering autofocus shooting in a variety of difficult situations.

Lightning is an amazing subject to try and photograph. Dazzling. Unpredictable. Fulfilling. I’ve been documenting the long arm of Zeus for more than two decades and still love it. First using transparencies and negatives, then digital. There are many ways to be creative when it comes to photographing lightning.

When you want to take a group photo while you’re out and about, it’s often helpful to ask a bystander to take the shot for you. It turns out even the President of the United States is sometimes asked to help shoot photos.

Here’s an interesting photography first that is set to happen in 2017: scientists are planning to capture the first ever photo of a black hole’s event horizon (the boundary of no return that light can’t event escape).

Since the introduction of the Fujifilm X-Series line of cameras, reviewers and consumers have struggled to compare them directly to the competition. Fujifilm’s is a tightly integrated system, wherein everything is a little bit different.

In 2015, photographer David Gaberle walked over 2,200 miles (3,600 kilometers) through some of the world’s most metropolitan areas, photographing people in cities such as New York, Tokyo, Hong Kong, Shanghai, Sydney, London and Seoul. He’s now turning this project into a book titled Metropolight.

I recently wrote an article about 8 Reasons You Should Buy A 50mm f/1.8 Lens and one part was about using it with the “El Bokeh Wall.” What’s an El Bokeh Wall? It’s using some aluminum foil to add beautiful bokeh to the background of your photos. Here’s a full tutorial on the technique.

In late 2015, I stumbled upon a strobe called the Godox TT685: a fully-featured speedlight that has radio master and transmitter capabilities built right in. Being a Nikon user, I had never experienced that type of wireless connectivity, and I bought 3 despite being leery of the price.

Same setting, same model, three different lighting scenarios. In this demo, Toronto wedding photographer Derrel Ho-Shing shows you the difference between shooting with natural light, regular strobe, and high speed sync.

They say a picture is worth a thousand words. But I wonder, what else do “they” say? In order to find out I’ve culled together the best quotes on the subject of photography. I hope they inspire you.

Khan Academy recently teamed up with the team at Pixar to create a free online course for people who are interested in seeing how Pixar artists “do their jobs.” But lest you think there’s nothing there for photographers, think again. One of the classes in this course will definitely appeal to still shooters.

The tone curve is one of the most powerful tools in photo editing, allowing you to change multiple values and essentially doing the job of several different adjustment layers. But it’s also complicated, and hard for beginners to understand. These two videos should help.

The new LG G6 smartphone ships with an artsy wallpaper that looks like a stylized number 6. A neat fact about the image is that it’s not a computer rendered artwork: it took two months to create and shoot the photos.

After one full year using the Sony mirrorless system for my professional work, I believe I can give a very honest and helpful review of the system that can help others decide if it’s right for them.

Lomography is selling a new limited edition film called Color Negative F²/400. It’s a film with an unusual concept and backstory: it was aged like wine in oak casks for 7 years.

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